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My World

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multikulti.com
Po latach wielkiej posuchy w soulowych, męskich głosach odrodził się jak feniks z popiołów Lee Fields, znany raczej małej garstce fanów amerykańskich, czarnych brzmień lat 70.
Jego najnowsza płyta "My World" to wielki powrót artysty, o którym bez wątpienia można powiedzieć, że przejął schedę po gigantach gatunku jak: Curtis Mayfield, Otisi Redding, Isaac Hayes, Marvin Gaye i Wilson Pickett'.
W 1999 roku Lee Fields nagrał funkową płytę "Let's Get a Groove On", większość towarzyszących mu muzyków występuje obecnie z Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, której kariera nabrała ostatnio wielkiego tempa, dodam tylko, że wielce zasłużenie.
Nowy krążek, w jeszcze większym niż dotąd stopniu sięga do unikalnej tradycji lat 60. i 70., kiedy to święcił triumfy soul podszyty południowym r&b i funkiem.
Bezpretensjonalne, uduchowione songi wyśpiewane ciepłym głosem Lee zdumiewają bogactwem pomysłów i paletą brzmieniowych barw.
autor: Piotr Szukała


promieniowanie.wordpress.com
Lee Fields ma na okładce rozmazaną buzię i gdyby ktoś powiedział, że urodził się w 1980 roku, możnaby dać temu wiarę. Pierwsze takty ustawiają referencje gdzie indziej. Ten dżentelmen grał soul i funk już pod koniec lat 60. Ma na koncie kilka płyt - na tyle mało, że nie zdążył osiwieć od scenicznych ekscesów.

Fields kompletnie ignoruje współczesne trendy i dlatego jego comeback po latach wydaje się szczery, podobnie jak wrzucane tu i tam zamiast fucków teksty w rodzaju "A man is incomplete without a lady in his life" - taki stosunek do kobiet jest równie obcy dzisiejszym gwiazdom soulu, co maniery przy stole. Jego comebackowy album jest pokryty patyną i ma w sobie naturalną elegancję i szyk, którego brakuje współczesnym wykonawcom. Zero plastiku. W wywiadach Fields przyznaje się do fascynacji Jayem-Z a nagrywa z muzykami The Budos Band i Antibalas - brzmieniem nie odstaje wiele od klasyków z Motown, i ma porównywalny ogień.

Pozostaje powiedzieć: WOW.

autor: Kamil Antosiewicz


Editor's info:
Lee Fields is a bona-fide, 100%, unadulterated, pure, gut-bucket soul singer. While the crate-digging funk and soul community bestowed "legendary" status upon him due to his undeniably solid series of rare 7" singles (and one LP) recorded and released on his own independent labels in the 70s, he's never been one to sit in a dusty corner. New York label/production team Truth & Soul, are ready to bring him to light with a brand new album of beat-heavy, deep soul ballads that will show soul-revivalists the world over what real soul is. After his rediscovery in the mid 90s, his faithful have featured him on a slew on singles, a full-length on Desco Records entitled "Let's Get It On', a full-length on Soul Fire entitled "Problems", and on Sharon Jones's critically acclaimed album, "Naturally". Most recently, he has featured on a number of tracks by French house producer, Martin Solveig. Suprisingly, many of of those songs have become top ten hits for Solveig and have turned Lee Fields into a bonafide celebrity in France and other parts of Europe. Yet, outside of a rabid cult following, his story remained untold in America. When Truth & Soul rose from Soul Fire's ashes in 2004, the first mission of label owners/producers Jeff Silverman and Leon Michels, was to record a sweet soul record that would be modeled after the near perfect formula that bands like The Moments, The Delfonics, and The Stylistics had created. In a nutshell - the duo wanted an album full of music that was both tough as nails and sweet as honey. They wanted ballads laced with lush strings and smooth vocal harmonies layered over a hard-hitting rhythm section. Michels and Silverman enlisted the service of a the group of New York studio musicians that have provided the back drop for records by The Dap Kings, Amy Winehouse, Bronx River Parkway, El Michels Affair and TV on The Radio. Those musicians include Leon Michels, Homer Steinweiss, Quincy Bright, Nick Movshon, Thomas Brenneck, Toby Pazner, Aaron Johnson, Dave Guy, Michael Leonhart, and members of legendary doo-wop group, The Del-Larks. Four years later and Lee Fields & The Expressions have successfully created a unique and personal sound that can hold court with the bands they set out to emulate. However, what they ve created in the process goes beyond just a carbon copy of a sweet soul music from the 60's and early 70's. The formula has remained the same but the style has been adapted for the ears of youngsters whose experiences with soul began with Amy, not Al, Otis and Marvin. Thirty years of retrospection has colored this cross-generational melding of the minds. It sounds odd on paper, but the results are classic: hip hop-reared record collectors come full circle to produce an album of beautiful soul music with one of the progenitors who made it all possible.


www.pitchforkmedia.com
Lee Fields is the real deal. The revival of old-school funk and soul sounds that began with Desco Records in New York and bands like Germany's Poets of Rhythm in the 1990s has produced a lot of fantastic throwback music, some of which stands right alongside the real thing from the late 60s and early 70s. Sharon Jones may be the queen of American revivalist soul, but what's easy to forget is that Jones was discovered by Phillip Lehman and Gabriel Roth singing backup for Fields on a session in the mid-90s. Fields cut his first 45 in 1969, a series of follow-ups on tiny labels in the 70s, then recorded an album in 1979 before disappearing for most of the 80s. He recorded a few albums for Ace in the 90s before landing at Desco and its offspring, Daptone and Soul Fire.

Now he's with Truth & Soul, and that crew, led by Leon (aka El) Michels, has helped him create one smoking mother of an old-sound soul record. There's a subtle hint of hip-hop in this brand of deep soul, but for the most part, it sounds like something that easily could have come out of some imaginary mid-point between Stax, Muscle Shoals, and Philadelphia International in about 1971. A few of the Southern-style ballads on My World are simply stunning, especially "Honey Dove". This is at least the third time he's recorded the song, and this version is a total bomb-- Fields sweats through every second as the guitar channels Steve Cropper, horns and a small string section drift through thee languid rhythm, and Homer Steinweiss lays down a perfectly understated and sharp drum part.
Steinweiss and the rest of the Expressions clearly feel this music and don't sound like mere imitators. They serve up an inventive arrangement on the moralistic funk track "Money I$ King", which is essentially through-composed-- the horns constantly shift, working up to a dissonant finale. The haunting backing vocals, bells, and shivering strings thaat color the cover of the Supremes' "My World Is Empty Without You" show a lot of imagination and a willingness to interpret a stone classic rather than simply parroting it. "Love Comes and Goes", with its big harmony vocal on the chorus, also takes the form out of its box a little.

Fields has been sampled a number of times by hip-hop artists, and he and the Expressions seem to invite another heist on the title track, offering up a tasty drum break and a supremely moody rhythm track that drips with vibraphone and pitch-black guitar. Even the instrumental "Expressions Theme" is solid, playing like a descendant of Young-Holt Unlimited's "Soulful Strut" and Willie Mitchell's solo LPs for Hi. For about 40 minutes, My World is like taking a trip back almost five decades. It loses a bit of steam at the end, but if there was any doubt Fields was still the real deal 40 years after his first record, this should obliterate it. My World is a throwback done right.
Lee Fields is the real deal. The revival of old-school funk and soul sounds that began with Desco Records in New York and bands like Germany's Poets of Rhythm in the 1990s has produced a lot of fantastic throwback music, some of which stands right alongside the real thing from the late 60s and early 70s. Sharon Jones may be the queen of American revivalist soul, but what's easy to forget is that Jones was discovered by Phillip Lehman and Gabriel Roth singing backup for Fields on a session in the mid-90s. Fields cut his first 45 in 1969, a series of follow-ups on tiny labels in the 70s, then recorded an album in 1979 before disappearing for most of the 80s. He recorded a few albums for Ace in the 90s before landing at Desco and its offspring, Daptone and Soul Fire.

Now he's with Truth & Soul, and that crew, led by Leon (aka El) Michels, has helped him create one smoking mother of an old-sound soul record. There's a subtle hint of hip-hop in this brand of deep soul, but for the most part, it sounds like something that easily could have come out of some imaginary mid-point between Stax, Muscle Shoals, and Philadelphia International in about 1971. A few of the Southern-style ballads on My World are simply stunning, especially "Honey Dove". This is at least the third time he's recorded the song, and this version is a total bomb-- Fields sweats through every second as the guitar channels Steve Cropper, horns and a small string section drift through thee languid rhythm, and Homer Steinweiss lays down a perfectly understated and sharp drum part.
Steinweiss and the rest of the Expressions clearly feel this music and don't sound like mere imitators. They serve up an inventive arrangement on the moralistic funk track "Money I$ King", which is essentially through-composed-- the horns constantly shift, working up to a dissonant finale. The haunting backing vocals, bells, and shivering strings thaat color the cover of the Supremes' "My World Is Empty Without You" show a lot of imagination and a willingness to interpret a stone classic rather than simply parroting it. "Love Comes and Goes", with its big harmony vocal on the chorus, also takes the form out of its box a little.

Fields has been sampled a number of times by hip-hop artists, and he and the Expressions seem to invite another heist on the title track, offering up a tasty drum break and a supremely moody rhythm track that drips with vibraphone and pitch-black guitar. Even the instrumental "Expressions Theme" is solid, playing like a descendant of Young-Holt Unlimited's "Soulful Strut" and Willie Mitchell's solo LPs for Hi. For about 40 minutes, My World is like taking a trip back almost five decades. It loses a bit of steam at the end, but if there was any doubt Fields was still the real deal 40 years after his first record, this should obliterate it. My World is a throwback done right.

by Joe Tangari, July 29, 2009
TSCD007

Opis

Wydawca
Truth & Soul (UK)
Artysta
Lee Fields
Nazwa
My World
Instrument
vocals
Zawiera
CD
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