Kategorie

We Inist! - Max Roach's Freedom Now Suite


  • Kod: CCD79002
  • Producent: Candid (UK)
  • Wykonawca: Max Roach
  • Nośnik: CD
  • Cena: 52,20 zł
  • Poleć produkt


premiera polska:
2003-10-01
kontynent: Ameryka Północna
kraj: USA
opakowanie: plastikowe etui
A revolution is unfurling - America's unfinished revolution. It is unfurling in lunch counters, buses, libraries and schools - wherever the dignity and potential of young men is denied. Youth and idealism are unfurling. Masses of Negroes are marching onto the stage of history and demanding their freedom now! said scholar A. Philip Randolph, quoted by original Candid producer Nat Hentoff in the engaging and informative sleeve notes to this landmark album. Receiving help from Martin Luther King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference and The Congress of Racial Equality, the spontaneous sit-in demonstrations by black students in Greensboro, North Carolina had spread rapidly. Their campaigns for freedom were given added impetus by the African students on their campuses from newly independent African states. Jazz musicians, until then mostly apolitical, were stimulated by the nonviolent mass action. Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Max Roach and Art Blakey all declared support for the public sit-ins; many new compositions were titled with African names. Max Roach had long been involved in the movements for integration and national autonomy. With writer/singer Oscar Brown Jnr he had been collaborating on an extensive work to celebrate the centennial of the Emancipation Declaration in 1963. Sections of the piece, altered by contemporary events, are featured on this album: Driva' Man, Freedom Day and All Africa. Driva' Man is a personification of the white overseer in slavery times who beat the men and often raped the women. Coleman Hawkins who plays the male counterpart to Abbey Lincoln was so intrigued by the project he stayed for the entire session. Lincoln's surging performance on Freedom Now project's a bursting impatience, reflecting the expectancy that immediately followed emancipation and Walter Benson's tenor performance is the best he ever recorded. Triptych: Prayer, Protest, Peace was originally conceived by Roach as a ballet, to be performed by the Ruth Walton Dancers. Prayer is the cry of an oppressed people; Protest is a final, uncontrollable unleashing of rage, for so long compressed as fear. Peace, as Max explained to Abbey, is the feeling of relaxed exhaustion after you have done everything you can to assert yourself. Nigerian Michael Olatunji sets a polyrhythmic beat on All Africa as Lincoln chants the names of African tribes and Olatunji answers with a freedom related saying from each tribe. The tune explores Afro-Americans' growing interest in Modern Africa and their own pre-American history. Set against the Sharpville Massacre in South Africa, Tears For Johannesburg sums up what Roach and the other musicians were trying to communicate on We Insist!, that there was still a long way to go, but the thread of freedom had been grasped and would never be let go.
muzycy:
Max Roach - Drums
Abbey Lincoln - Vocal
Booker Little - Trumpet
Julian Priester - Trombone
Walter Benton - Tenor Saxophone
Coleman Hawkins - Tenor Saxophone
James Schenck - Bass
Michael Olatuji - Congas
Ray Mantilla - Percussion
Thomas DuVall - PerscussionMax Roach - Drums
Abbey Lincoln - Vocal
Booker Little - Trumpet
Julian Priester - Trombone
Walter Benton - Tenor Saxophone
Coleman Hawkins - Tenor Saxophone
James Schenck - Bass
Michael Olatuji - Congas
Ray Mantilla - Percussion
Thomas DuVall - Perscussion
utwory:
1. Driva' Man
2. Freedom Day
3. Triptych: Prayer/Protest/Peace
4. All Africa
5. Tears For Johannesburg
wydano: 2003-10-01
nagrano: 09-1960
more info: www.candidrecords.com

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