Kategorien

Crawfish Lady


  • Schlüssel: JUST134
  • den Hersteller: Justin Time (CA)
  • Herstellerschlüssel: 068944013425
  • Preis: 59,90 zł
  • Produkt empfehlen

Blues & Rock/Rythm & Blues
premiera polska:
2000-06-03
kontynent: Ameryka Północna
kraj: USA
opakowanie: plastikowe etui
opis:

Editor's info:
This album is Bryan's first studio release in five years, nine of the twelve tracks are Lee originals and the musical diversity displayed is impressive. With tracks that range from in-the-pocket funk to Chicago Blues to straight-ahead R&B, Bryan proves that he is devoid of labels and not about be pigeonholed into playing just one style of music.As Bryan told me, "I like this record. I think it's the best thing I have ever done. I'm real proud of it. II wanted to prove to people what I could create. If the good Lord called me now I could go because I have proved to everybody what I am made of." - Excerpt from the liner notes of Bret Bonner / Living Blues MagazineLiner NotesOne listen to Bryan Lee and you'll be wondering where this man has been hiding himself. His rock-solid guitar lines and his powerhouse vocals are delivered with a refreshing sense of (odd as it may sound) wide-open control. While there is nothing timid about Bryan's music, there is also never a sense of chaos, no matter what the tempo. Bryan understands that it is the quiet places in the blues that make the statements, yet every once in a while you've got to remind people about the pent-up energy encased within those moments of silence. Bryan does both like a master storyteller.Bryan Lee was born on March 16, 1943 in Two Rivers, Wisconsin. By the age of eight, his eyesight was gone, but his interest in music was just beginning. Like many kids of the early 1950's, Lee would stay up late at night and pick up radio broadcasts out of the deep South listening for the real thing. And the real thing that Lee was listening for was the Blues. "See, in my town, if you went into the store to buy 'Tutti Frutti' by Little Richard, you had to settle for 'Tutti Frutti' by Pat Boone!" Bryan's needs were taken care of late nights on WLAC, 1510 AM out of Nashville. "This was how I got to hear guys like Elmore James, Albert King and Albert Collies. I would order my records from their sponsors Ernie's Record Mart, Randy's Record Shop and Buckley's Record Shops. I even remember the address at Buckley's! It was 1707 Church Street. I remember the first time I heard 'Crosscut Saw' I about fell out of my chair. When he hit that guitar, oh man!" For his eleventh birthday Lee received a guitar from his mother, an old pink and black Harmony acoustic, and he was quickly devoting all of his free time to figuring out how to get the sounds he was hearing on the radio. By his late teens, Bryan was playing rhythm guitar in a regional band, The Glaciers. "We had a singer who was a crooner who did the Elvis Presley type stuff and I was the fat ugly kid with the voice who could scream so I did the Little Richard and the Chuck Berry... I didn't come up through the rock 'n' roll side of it like a lot of others, I came up through the black side of the music. I was listening to (recordings on) Chess and Checker and later Delmark. My whole point is where I came from is a little different for a white guy. It's gotten me into some trouble too. You're more-under the microscope when you are white playing the blues."Through the 1960's, Bryan spent more and more time in Chicago opening for various blues artists and befriending others. Artists like Albert King, Freddie King and Albert Collins were available and inspirational. One of the biggest influences on his sound was the young Luther Allison with is raw, wide-open energy. "I loved Luther, man. Luther taught me a lot. He lived in Madison and was always close-by. He was always a friend. Luther saw no color, he just loved the music."In January of 1982, Bryan made a move that would forever change his life. He packed his bags and headed south to the Crescent City. New Orleans offered Bryan a steady stream of gigs and no more Wisconsin winters! "I felt a vibe here. It's greasy and sleazy and funky! Some of the rhythms that have come out of this city are like no other place. You've got that gumbo of the Caribbean, Africa, the Indians and the Delta. It's all here and I wanted to experience it." He settled in the French Quarter because he felt it was a place where a blind person could get by without driving or having to depend on others. "I really liked living in the Quarter. The street people weren't a real ornery sort. They'd look out for you." Within a year Bryan had landed what turned out to be a long-term stint at the legendary Old Absinthe House. For the next fourteen years, he played five nights a week at the bar, developing a huge following and a solid reputation. Over the years, luminaries from both the rock and blues worlds would stop in and check out the man they had been hearing so much about. It wasn't unusual for the likes of Eric Clapton, Robert Plant, Johnny Winter or James Cotton to be in the crowd.Although based in New Orleans, Bryan's music is not regionally confined; it has a sound all its own. "When I first came down here, I realized there was a real love of blues but not a lot available. I brought a Chicago and a Memphis influence down here, then I started picking up the rhythms from down here." If you listen hard you might hear a bit of Luther Allison, a touch of Gatemouth Brown, a taste of Freddie King, even a hint of T-Bone Walker. But none of this is ever any more than a bit of spice in the gumbo. Unlike so many blues players on the circuit day, Bryan Lee manages to sound like Bryan Lee. This album is Bryan's first studio release in five years. Nine of the twelve tracks are Lee originals and the musical diversity displayed is impressive. With tracks that range from in-the-pocket funk to Chicago Blues to straight-ahead R&B, Bryan proves that he is devoid of labels and not about to be pigeonholed into playing just one style of music.Personnel includes, first and foremost, longtime band member Marc Adams on organ. Adams' grooves allow Bryan and the crew to lock down into funky Meters-like numbers such as "Chitlin's" and the title track "Crawfish Lady." The horn section of Ward Smith and Barney Floyd give the music a flushed-out feel especially evident on the Memphis-influenced soul blues sounds of "Louisiana Woman" and "Why Did You Do It?" Solid bottom-end support is covered by bassist André Maritato and former Chubby Carrier drummer Sammy Neal, with all the holes filled in by pianist George Rossy.As Bryan told me, "I like this record. I think it's the best thing I have ever done. I'm real proud of it. I wanted to prove to people what I could create. If the good Lord called me now I could go because I have proved to everybody what I am made of." What he's made of is the blues.
by Brett J. Bonner - Living Blues Magazine

muzycy:
Marc Adams: organ; Barney Floyd: trumpet; Jody Golick: tenor saxophone (on tracks 03 and 06); Bryan Lee: guitar and voice; Ranee Lee: background vocals (on tracks 01 and 04); André Maritato: bass; Sammy Neal: drums; George Rossy: piano; Ward Smith: tenor saxophone
utwory:
01 Palace Of The King 3:47
02 Louisiana Woman 5:16
03 Can't Get Enough 3:16
04 Crawfish Lady 5:18
05 Why Did You Do It? 3:33
06 What You Gonna Do? 5:00
07 Noize With The Boyz? 5:53
08 Sweet And Beautiful Lady 4:52
09 Something's Wrong 5:32
10 Winehead Woman 7:36
11 Chitlin's 4:44
12 Kiss My Ass For A Change 3:17

wydano: 2000-04
more info: www.justin-time.com
more info2: www.fusion3.com

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