Kategorie

Borrowed From Children


  • Kod: 5843CD
  • On Stock
  • Producent: 577 Records (USA)
  • Wykonawca: Paul Flaherty / Randall Colbourne / James Chumley Hunt / Mike Roberson
  • Nośnik: CD
  • Instrument lidera: saxes
  • Cena: 61,99 zł
  • Poleć produkt

Avant Jazz / Free Improvisation / Avant-Garde
premiera polska:
2020-07-22
kontynent: Ameryka Północna
kraj: USA
opakowanie: digipackowe etui
opis:

multikulti.com - ocena * * * * 1/2:
Paul Flaherty to osobna planeta w galaktyce muzyki free. Krąży w układzie obok kilkunastu innych planet jak Albert Ayler, Pharoah Sanders, David S. Ware. Ciągle aktywny, ciągle gra swoje, ciągle z nowymi muzykami. Wygląda jak hippisowski guru Terry Riley, i podobnie jak Riley wieści światu swą opowieść, która jest tylko jego opowieścią. Możesz ją zaakceptować, albo w całości odrzucić. Ja należę do tych pierwszych.

"Borrowed From Children" to zaledwie i aż cztery utwory, blisko 55 minut potężnej muzyki, która niczego nie udowadnia, nigdzie się nie spieszy, nie rozgląda się na boki, nie kalkuluje, to muzyczne trzęsienie ziemi!
Od pierwszej minuty nagrania mamy do czynienia z gęstym, pulsującym, porywającym free, narracja może poruszać się spiralnie, może lewitować z lekkością jak obłok, może przypominać wyładowania atmosferyczne, może w końcu zapalać się jak w pożarze. To jakby cztery główne wątki schodziły się w jeden by w sekundę rozpaść się na kawałki.

Trzeba przyznać, że żadna oficyna w ostatnich latach nie zrobiła tyle dla muzyki improwizowanej jak nowojorska 577 Records, dając przestrzeń do zaistnienia wielu znakomitych nagrań Daniela Cartera, Sabira Mateena, Pata Thomasa, Granta Calvina Westona, Williama Parkera, Patricka Holmesa, Geralda Cleavera czy Paula Flaherty'ego.
Copyright © 1996-2020 Multikulti Project. All rights reserved

Editor's info:
The ‘freeform music scene’ is often a situation where musicians get to improvise together without a lot of prior interactions. But in this case, Paul Flaherty and Randall Colbourne have played together for 32 years. The two artists have collaborated with James Chumley Hunt on and off since the 90s, and with Mike Roberson since 2012.

The live album presented here is the recording of the very first time they got together as a quartet. The music is ‘improvised freeform’, created without outline or discussion. It draws from all and any musical genres including jazz, rock, blues, classical, noise, marching bands, eastern, and more. Freeform doesn't mean without form, just without a preconceived form. Once the improvisation is finished, the music has taken its form.

"Borrowed from Children" is a Native American phrase that refers not to inheriting the land from our ancestors, but rather to borrow it from our children. This music has been created in the hope that we will remember this and may this moment of global crisis be a time to meditate on the meaning of this.

“The original inspiration for this album comes from the music of Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor, soon to be followed by Albert Ayler, the late period of John Coltrane, Pharaoh Sanders, Evan Parker, Derek Bailey, Peter Brötzmann and evolution of musicians from these paths, carrying the music on to this day. I began playing freeform in 1972 and have always felt that this is where I belong.

Can you explain free music to those who question its validity? This music has been roundly attacked in the past, and the past is always near. I feel that the essence of freely improvised music is a release to something greater, and hopefully allowing it to transcend the moment. It may be an ‘asking’ for something to take over. Trust is the key and belief is the path. Trust where it goes and believe that what's happening is right. Following, listening and becoming totally engaged.

When it works it's a mystical sensation, as unplanned music winds, explodes and recedes into peace and chaos in good unpredictable time. The experience that something else has taken over, and the player has become the listener, is what feels magical. And the belief that musicians can enter these moments together and have the music succeed, makes it seem magical even more so. This can happen in any form of music, but since freeform has no plans or restrictions, it's almost imperative that the players release and get out of the way. Inner artist, or a visitation . . . . that's personal.

I've found over the years that more and more players from different genres have become open to playing this way. Where once the idea had to be explained and musicians had to be coaxed into trying it, the music has survived it's initial critical onslaught and is thriving everywhere. Of course… It's still basically hated music to the general public. But on we go.” - Paul Flaherty

londonjazznews.com
Saxophonist Paul Flaherty has spent much of the last 50 years as a musical iconoclast in the American North East, but since the early 2000’s has been prolifically featuring on records – with others, as leader, or solo – for a sweep of record labels. Borrowed from Children is his second for 577 Records.

The single release Brazen Eyes captures the spirit of the album, opening with a searching, looping, sax line. All is briefly normal, before the first unexpected pause – an interruption by a dramatic halting pause for breath. The pauses are orchestrated steps, compositional keys to bring in and develop the band: the electric guitar pulses, a muscular trumpet. Together moan, groan. Randall Colbourne gets a moment with his drums accompanied by guitar and the horns as a sideline, before it develops into an croaky storming opus.

Crude Gray Sky presents a juxtaposition of a relaxed back line and calm trumpet with Flaherty’s thrashing, anguished sax. Dark Leaves Linger summons a Mingus-esque clowned chaos, the clarity of James Chumley Hunt’s horn wrestling with choked squeals and a tenor call to arms. The despondent mood breaks on the concise An Old Man Gone, a hectic brain-melting and changeable musical tour, and the bonus digital vignette Cigar Store Bathtub – layering bubbling horns with hints of Mike Roberson’s Americana guitar bends and space-age submarine pings.

Saxophones and drums may be at the core of the group (Flaherty and Colbourne have been playing together since the 80s) but some of freshness comes from the (comparatively) new arrivals. The horn interplay with Chumley Hunt is clear and refreshing in its often stylistic contrast, but the addition of Roberson’s more psychedelic metallic sound, itself combined with Hunt’s trumpet, adds extra flavour to the broth which Flaherty is floating in.

A well-known Native American phrase proposes that instead of inheriting the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children. It is this sentiment and the climate crisis that Flaherty is aiming to evoke with the urgent music on the album. Yet the language Flaherty often uses for his musical journey – of jostling jazz tribes, friction with a mainstream public, and artistic exile – which at first glance doesn’t quite sit. The climate crisis is something which requires radical change, but also public buy-in, unity and collective cooperative action.

However, the release of Borrowed from Children during an NYC-centred pandemic perhaps gives fresh insight. The compatibility of radical global restructuring (the rise of free jazz principles) begins to fall within the consensus framework of collective change (returning to a pre-industrial era respect for our environment); for the first time in decades it feels there is an impetus for that change. Flaherty himself explains his musical aspirations as a “Release to something greater, and hopefully allowing it to transcend the moment … Trust is the key and belief is the path.” Maybe now is the only time that Flaherty and free jazz can be both a symbol of a radical new age future, and a call to return to a revered nostalgic past.
by Dan Bergsagel


Salt Peanuts
American veteran sax player Paul Flaherty believes that the «essence of freely improvised music is a release to something greater… It may be an ‘asking’ for something to take over». And he continues and advises how to get involved in this kind of powerful-spiritual, free-improvised experience: «trust is the key, and belief is the path. Trust where it goes and believe that what’s happening is right. Following, listening, and becoming totally engaged. When it works it’s a mystical sensation, as unplanned music winds, explodes, and recedes into peace and chaos in good unpredictable time. The experience that something else has taken over, and the player has become the listener, is what feels magical».

Flaherty’s new «Borrowed From Children» borrows a Native American phrase that refers not to inherit the land from our ancestors, but rather to borrow it from our children. This album relies on the trust solidified by long and lasting interactions of four musicians. Flaherty and drummer Randall Colbourne have been playing together since 1988, for 32 years now, and since the nineties kept collaboration with trumpeter James Chumley Hunt, and adding guitarist Mike Roberson to their common work in 2012. The quartet album was recorded live in concert on November 30th, 2019 at Willimantic Records, Willimantic, CT, apparently, when all the four musicians got together on stage for the very first time as a quartet.

Flaherty says that the original inspiration for «Borrowed From Children» came from «the music of Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor, soon to be followed by Albert Ayler, the late period of John Coltrane, Pharaoh Sanders, Evan Parker, Derek Bailey, Peter Brötzmann and evolution of musicians from these paths, carrying the music on to this day». There are some Brötzmann-like wild, brutal cries on the opening piece «Crude Gray Sky», but then the original voice of Flaherty soon surfaces and the quartet develops its, free-associative, free-form, free-improvised, inclusive interplay that draws from all and any musical genres including jazz, rock, blues, classical, noise, and marching bands. In this and other extended improvisation, Flaherty suggests a tone and a mood but the quartet allows the collective, energetic interplay to find its own inner, organic rational, pulse, and breath of the piece. The following «Dark Leaves Linger» and «Brazen Eyes» search for a more vulnerable, bluesy avenues, but «An Old Man Gone» returns to the powerful, fiery mode. The bonus piece (available in the digital version) cements this set with an emotional ballad.
by Eyal Hareuveni

AllAboutJazz
Let's misquote a Rolling Stones' lyric here, with the music of Paul Flaherty "you can always get what you want," and maybe to a greater extent, "you get what you need." For more decades than he might want to count, the saxophonist has been making his self-described 'hated music.' We're talking hate as in a bugaboo, a bogey, or a thorn in one's flesh. Because his music is free. Free like a Jean-Michel Basquiat painting or a Warner Brothers Wile E. Coyote vs. Road Runner cartoon.

The path Flaherty chose, like that of Jack Wright, John Dikeman, and Charles Gayle, is a desolate one. Blowing unadulterated sounds as he does was punk rock two decades before punk rock. You won't hear it on a jukebox, nor a jazz radio station. But hearing Flaherty in person live is an experience, a happening. This live recording from 2019 is just such beautiful hate. Flaherty is reunited with his long time sideman, drummer Randall Colbourne. Together they have released a few dozen discs. The quartet heard here also includes guitarist Mike Roberson and trumpeter James Chumley Hunt.

The four tracks and 61-minutes of music touch on multiple structures and methodologies, none preplanned or notated. The music can spiral and levitate as light as cloud or alight as in a wildfire. Flaherty comes from the Albert Ayler-Pharoah Sanders-Marshall Allen tradition with a spiritual approach to free blowing. This is evident throughout, especially on "Dark Leaves Linger" where his saxophone speaks with a bluesy growl against Hunt's conch shell, then Roberson's bouncing guitar lines. The quartet acts as a cooperative, exchanging ideas and strategizing together. Freed of structured sound, the resourceful listener can summon fragments of Albert and Donald Ayler, Ornette Coleman and Don Cherry, plus Bern Nix.

Solo or in duo with a drummer (Colbourne or Chris Corsano), Flaherty is often obliged to perform fiery musical feats. Here he acts as an unselfish leader. "Brazen Eyes" opens more like a classical chamber piece than outward avant sound. As the music progresses, Colbourne's drumming, freed of time a la Sunny Murray, opens into a deferential brain storm. Each instrument is heard equally up front, and maybe it's just imagination, but are the classic "You Don't Know What Love Is" and fragments of Miles Davis' Sketches Of Spain (Columbia, 1960) quoted here? Maybe, by trying to listening sometimes, you get what you need.
By Mark Corroto

muzycy:
Paul Flaherty - Alto / Tenor Sax
Randall Colbourne - Drums
James Chumley Hunt - Trumpet, Conch Shells
Mike Roberson - Electric Guitar

utwory:
1. Crude Gray Sky 17:26
2. Dark Leaves Linger 16:01
3. Brazen Eyes 14:57
4. An Old Man Gone 4:51

total time - 53:18
wydano: May 22, 2020
nagrano: Recorded in Connecticut, US

more info: www.577records.com





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